and the winner is…

So the headline news today is that in a well-hyped ceremony to give awards to people who have done their job well some of the people were announced as the winners of an award and then someone else realised it was a mistake and that some other people should have been given the award.

Meanwhile, in other news, three quarters of a million people are trapped in Western Mosul as Iraqi forces seek to expel the IS fighters; people are still dying every day as they attempt to cross the Mediterranean to get to Europe; people around the world (and in the UK) are being bought and sold as slaves; famine is beginning to stalk its prey in South Sudan; politicians are seeking to evade public scrutiny by declaring those who criticise as ‘fake news’ (it happened in the UK yesterday when our Home Secretary tried to defend the Government’s decision to stop taking any more unaccompanied refugee children under the ‘Dubs Amendment’)…
You get the idea.

I am not saying that it was surprising that at an awards ceremony as well-organised as the Oscars the wrong film should be announced as the winner of ‘best picture’. It’s difficult to imagine quite what went wrong, or how embarrassed people felt when the error was realised. But should this be the first headline on the news today? Is this the most important thing that has happened in our world?

I suspect that ‘envelopegate’ or whatever this gets dubbed will be forgotten soon enough, except perhaps by those who made the mistake – it may haunt them for a while, and maybe we should spare a thought for them. Their mistake was made public – broadcast across the world and then becoming headline news. Most of our mistakes are less well publicised (thank the Lord).

I try to remember to offer prayers when I hear of tragedies and crises whether they are global, national, local or personal. I know that lots of you do too. I know that lots of churches do. Will we pray as fervently for those caught up in ‘envelopegate’ as in the other issues I highlighted?

Can we get a bit of perspective back, please, and focus more on the more important things – matters of life and death?

Can we show some grace and compassion to all, please, recognising that everyone makes mistakes?

Can we get worked up enough about the important things in life to pray about them, and then to take action and be part of the answer to that prayer?

Be blessed, be a blessing

the unwinner is…

red carpetSo the Academy has made its awards. Oscars have been given to the winners. The nominees who were not chosen have put on their best ‘I’m so pleased for the winner, it was an honour just to be nominated’ smiles. The speeches have been speeched, the thank-yous have been thanked, the tears have been shed. The after-parties have been attended, the interviews are over. Now the red carpet is being rolled up again and the hysteria is dying down.

This whole business of awards interests me. It is good to commend excellence. It is good to encourage. It is good to inspire people to do better. But where was the award for best cup of tea? Where was the award for most thoughtful word of encouragement? Where are the awards for the hundreds of names that scroll past our eyes at the end of a film (when we wait in case there’s an extra bit right at the end)? I would love to see an award for ‘Best Best Boy’!

I know you could say that the awards that are given include recognition for those who have worked behind the scenes but that’s a bit like posting a blanket ‘thank you’ on Facebook for all your Christmas presents rather than writing individual thank you cards or making personal phone calls.

So this bloggage is a reminder to me to make sure that I thank people. I don’t get it right all the time, and I am sorry for that. But as well as thanking the obvious people, I want to encourage us to thank the people who often go unnoticed, the people who may feel unappreciated, those who will never win an award: the unwinners.

And what’s the award? It’s a Wedogofase, which stands for ‘Well done, good and faithful servant’. To all of the unwinners who have worked hard without thanks and without recognition I present you with a Wedogofase from God. I will try to present it to you personally.

Be blessed, be a blessing.

graduation

Yesterday afternoon was spent at Essex University attending two graduation ceremonies. No, not for me, but in my capacity as Baptist Chaplain at the University. It was inspiring watching the hundreds of graduates and hearing the joy and excitement of their friends and families who had supported them through the process.

In congratulating the Graduates the Chancellor of the University commented that the hard work starts here. This life is not a dress rehearsal – you only get one shot at it.

Acclaimed songwriter Annie Lennox and London Olympic star Laura Trott were awarded honorary degrees at the University of Essex todayTwo inspiring women were awarded honorary Doctorates. Annie Lennox was awarded a Doctorate for her campaigning and work for human rights and many other causes. The University’s Dr Pam Cox spoke about Ms Lennox’s support for a wide-range of humanitarian projects which have made vital, practical, life-saving differences – above all in South Africa. Dr Cox also mentioned Ms Lennox’s ‘SING’ campaign which works with women and children with HIV – raising awareness regarding preventing the transmission of the virus from mother to child.

Annie Lennox’s speech was inspiring, humble, humorous and uplifting. At least it lifted all of us to our feet in a standing ovation. I stood as much for what she is doing to make a difference in the world as for her speech. You can read her speech in full here (click ‘see more’)

The second Honorary Doctorate was awarded to Laura Trott. She is a phenomenal cyclist who won two gold medals at the 2012 Olympics, holds world records and is also a multiple world champion. She took up cycling because her mum wanted to lose weight (honestly) and to try to control her asthma. The idea that she is asthmatic and still hurtles around the track at such phenomenal speeds is astounding.

Her speech was shorter and of a different style to Annie Lennox’s speech, but it was nonetheless also inspiring – especially considering that this 21 year old is not a trained public speaker. I do like her simple tweet after the ceremony: “Just call me Dr Trott.” Simple, yet I suspect revealing a degree (pun intended) of pride with a big smile.

So what was most inspiring: graduates and their families; Annie Lennox; Laura Trott? Actually it was a conversation I had with someone who simply introduced theirself with their first name and surname. I later discovered that he was Lord … and is very influential and important. The humility was most impressive on a day when people were being honoured with awards.

It reminded me that I should seek to impress an audience of One. His approval and joy is more than enough, keeps us humble and reminds us that we all need to be cautious to keep humble when others praise us and seek to pass on the glory to the One who deserves it.

Be blessed, be a blessing.